Info­graph­ics: Pro­tein in Europe

The auton­o­my lev­el of Euro­pean ani­mal hus­bandry varies depend­ing on the pro­tein group. Fact is: Europe will remain depen­dent on imports. How­ev­er, in the long term, breed­ing and tech­ni­cal advances will increase inde­pen­dence. See our inter­ac­tive graph­ics to find out what is hap­pen­ing where.

Over the next few years, glob­al meat pro­duc­tion will increase sig­nif­i­cant­ly, which may lead to price fluc­tu­a­tions on the soy­bean mar­ket. At the same time, con­sumers have high­er demands in terms of trace­abil­i­ty and eco-bal­ance. This is a par­tic­u­lar chal­lenge for Europe, as a large pro­por­tion of the required pro­tein feed comes from abroad.

See the inter­ac­tive info­graph­ics to find out what is hap­pen­ing in Europe and how gaps could be filled.


SOYA PRODUCTION WORLDWIDE AND IN EUROPE

Italy and France are the largest soya pro­duc­ers in Europe. Of the 347m t of soya pro­duced world­wide, 80% goes to the food indus­try for oil and pro­tein pro­duc­tion. After press­ing or extrac­tion, soya meal remains for ani­mal feed.

 

IMPORTS INTO THE EU

32,4m t

14.1m t of soy­abeans and 18.3m t of soy­abeans meal are import­ed into the EU 28 per year.

 

 

EUROPEAN AUTONOMY BY PROTEIN CONTENT CATEGORY

Dis­cov­er the pro­por­tion of self-suf­fi­cien­cy depend­ing on the pro­tein group:

pro­tein con­tent< 15%

86%

pro­tein con­tent15-30%

pro­tein con­tent30-50%

 

 

EU 28 TOTAL PROTEIN USE

Sort­ed by source, in mil­lion t raw pro­tein

18,54m tCrops38m tRoughage25,95m tCo-prod­ucts from press­ing2,5m tNon-plant sources

 

 

DEVELOPMENT OF MEAT PRODUCTION

In the mid-term, no price explo­sion is to be expect­ed on the soy­abean mar­ket: Pro­jec­tions by the USDA pre­dict a soy­abean meal price increase of only $35 (£29)/t by 2027/2028. In the long term, some para­me­ters point to pos­si­ble sup­ply bot­tle­necks. For exam­ple, the increase in glob­al meat pro­duc­tion, accord­ing to the FAO.

 

 

HOW TO CLOSE THE GAP?

Old and new pro­tein sources offer solu­tions for more inde­pen­dence

RAPESEED CAKE
Rape­seed meal with low fibre con­tent and pro­tein con­tent up to 46% thanks to new pro­cess­ing meth­ods

PEAS, BEANS, LUPINS AND CO
Good can­di­dates to boost self-suf­fi­cien­cy in mid to high pro­tein lev­els

EUROPEAN SOYA
There is hope that breed­ing will help adapt soya to Euro­pean cli­mates and get rid of unwant­ed ingre­di­ents

INSECTS
Very good amino acid pat­terns and unbeat­able area effi­cien­cy – but EU leg­is­la­tion could be an obsta­cle

BACTERIA
They turn CO2 into a high­ly con­cen­trat­ed pro­tein prod­uct. How­ev­er, envi­ron­men­tal foot­print needs to be improved

ALGAE
With 50% crude pro­tein con­tent, they are a good source of pro­tein for pigs, but cur­rent­ly expen­sive to pro­duce

 

SOURCES: FAO, DG AGRI (FIGURES 2017-2018), AGRESTE